KARAH FRANCES

3 basic rules for writing a bio:

  • Start with your name

  • write in third person

  • keep it under 300 words

(I also recall reading about getting our personality across and many of us know most people write their own bios anyway.)

Escaping the underserved, crime-ridden and substance-abused environment from which I started, turned out to be a major turning point in life. Now deciding to come back to this same community a decade later has been another. 

After four years of Architectural Drafting at a vocational high school here in New Bedford, I chose to stay with it. Attending college seemed like the only way out of the environment I was in. It took over $33K in student loans and a year of Architecture in Boston to realize that wasn’t the life I wanted. Somewhere along the way, the California bug had bit me, or perhaps a higher source had different plans, because I wasn’t even exactly sure what I wanted to do there or where the compelling feeling to go came from. 

 

Dropping out and simultaneously enrolling in school for Massage Therapy, was another pivotal decision. Within eighteen months of studying the human body, mind and spiritual connection, a new healthy way of living emerged. Yoga and meditation became daily practices. Cigarettes, pharmaceuticals, alcohol and processed foods faded from desires almost over night.

 

Soon after graduation, a journey of self-exploration and transformation continued on the road. The car was packed, there was a trade under my belt that I fell in love with and the rest was figured out along the way. While exploring the west coast and creating in the Arts: painting, music, writing, acting and photography, a mobile Massage Therapy business, gradually built off word-of-mouth, began to thrive. It’s been a blessing this past decade to heal with all walks of life: pregnant women and infants to elderly, homeless and unwell to thriving celebrities, average laborers and business executives to professional athletes.

Overtime, life coaching naturally became an integral part of these exchanges with people. It’s funny how a Psychology course while in school for massage seemed silly, but that, reading countless self-help books and enduring life’s trial and errors were a huge influence. Eventually, credentials and learning other skills to better assist people in healing became a desire. The Life Purpose Institute helped foster the ability to listen attentively and facilitate efficiently. 

Life experience and education, including certificates issued by Family & Youth Services Bureau for completing courses in Positive Youth Development, Adolescent Development and Creating a Safe Space for LGBTQ Teens, provided the confidence to proceed in founding FOCUS Youth Center, a space I wish existed when I was an at-risk youth with no opportunities to explore interests or talents.

I’m looking forward to guiding young people through a self-exploration process to gaining focus in passions, without them having to leave their hometown and families behind. Meanwhile, enjoying a reunion with family and friends, traveling back and forth to L.A for clientele and completing other personal art projects, is where most of my time is enjoyed. 

For those with a similar vision, let’s join forces, heal our communities and create a brighter world together.